SaveTrace1
SaveTrace2
SaveTrace3
SaveTrace4

Here’s one in a man’s front yard. He’s a very nice fellow and seems to be aware of the value of what he has, but who knows what may happen when the next generation comes along. It reads, “1775-1795 BOONE TRACE and KENTUCKY 1792-1942” which commemorates the 150th anniversary of the founding of Kentucky. Seven of these markers were placed by the Laurel County Historical Society in 1942.

SaveTrace5
SaveTrace6

The roads are not marked. This is Hwy 388, “Redhouse Road,” with Otter Creek running along next to it which Daniel Boone followed into Boonesboro in 1775.

The DAR also had put out 14 markers along Boone Trace in 1915 indicating that THEY felt The Trace to be of great historical significance a HUNDRED years ago!

Boone Trace goes to the heart of certainly all Kentuckians and extends to all Americans. But somehow, it’s been lost and forgotten. Remnants are slipping away to extinction. It represents the spirit of America to dream, seek, achieve and triumph. It’s at the very core of all of us. It is part of us, and we are part of it.

I’ll leave you with a quote from a book by Robert Brown, speaking about what the opening of Kentucky meant to our country:

SaveTrace7
SaveTrace8

“But whatever lay beyond, on the sunlit pastures and hills of coming years, Kentucky was the key, the first West. Kentucky was the threshold, the beachhead, to who-knew-what playlands and empires of the future, farther west”.

So please, join us in this effort to rescue, restore and preserve “that little road”, Boone Trace. Forever.

You can contact us at this web-site, and soon there will be a voluntary organization formed called “Friends of Boone Trace, LLC” with no dues but donations accepted which will be placed in a dedicated bank account to be used solely for preservation of The Trace. The only essential requirement is that the “member” will agree to receive a periodic e-mail about news and activities of the group.

 

This is the Twetty’s Fort marker which fortunately is on a 1.1 acre piece of property owned by the city of Richmond and designated to be a park, called Twetty’s Fort Park.

There is an ongoing tragedy surrounding Boone Trace that’s not being addressed with any definitive solution as yet.

The markers are disappearing, and the roads are not marked.

This is a list of some of the markers in danger. It’s only a partial list. Counting markers, buildings, cemeteries, and so forth, we’ve found about 45 “markers” of The Trace; and they are ALL in danger, because there is no concerted effort to re-identify and preserve The Trace permanently. AND THIS NEEDS TO BE DONE!!

  • Raccon Springs
  • Happy Hollow
  • Fariston
  • Feltner-Steel Road
  • Northeast London
  • Wood's Block House
  • Twetty's Fort

Save the Trace

sign in snow
TwittysFortMarker

But as you can see, it’s surrounded by what are called “Planned Unit Developments,“ and a loose bulldozer could ruin things in a heartbeat.

RaccoonSpringsHistoricMarker

Raccoon Springs

Here’s one in a man’s front yard. He’s a very nice fellow and seems to be aware of the value of what he has, but who knows what may happen when the next generation comes along. It reads, “1775-1795 BOONE TRACE and KENTUCKY 1792-1942” which commemorates the 150th anniversary of the founding of Kentucky. Seven of these markers were placed by the Laurel County Historical Society in 1942.

35-large.jpg_resize
SamBlackRoadMarker (1)
47-large (1)

The roads are not marked. This is Hwy 388, “Redhouse Road,” with Otter Creek running along next to it which Daniel Boone followed into Boonesboro in 1775.

The DAR also had put out 14 markers along Boone Trace in 1915 indicating that THEY felt The Trace to be of great historical significance a HUNDRED years ago!

Boone Trace goes to the heart of certainly all Kentuckians and extends to all Americans. But somehow, it’s been lost and forgotten. Remnants are slipping away to extinction. It represents the spirit of America to dream, seek, achieve and triumph. It’s at the very core of all of us. It is part of us, and we are part of it.

I’ll leave you with a quote from a book by Robert Brown, speaking about what the opening of Kentucky meant to our country:

29-large.jpg_resize

So please, join us in this effort to rescue, restore and preserve “that little road”, Boone Trace. Forever.

You can contact us at this web-site. There is a voluntary organization formed called “Friends of Boone Trace, LLC” with no dues but donations accepted which will be placed in a dedicated bank account to be used solely for preservation of The Trace. The only essential requirement is that the “member” will agree to receive a periodic e-mail about news and activities of the group.

 

“But whatever lay beyond, on the sunlit pastures and hills of coming years, Kentucky was the key, the first West. Kentucky was the threshold, the beachhead, to who-knew-what playlands and empires of the future, farther west”.

Trace

What’s New!

Click on the above to Learn More

© 2016- 2017,  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Friends of Boone Trace 1775
Website Maintained by Graphic Enterprises

facebook

 

shopify stats